Malaysia

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Malaysia dating guide advises how to meet single girls. You just need to know the basic steps how to date Malaysian women. Learn how to arrange dates with hot Malaysian girls, how to take your relationship to the next level and how to find your soulmate and fall in love. Read more on how to date local women and where to meet girls in Malaysia, Asia.


Girls in Malaysia:

  • Looks of girls: 3 / 5
  • Attitude of girls: 3.5 / 5
  • Loyalty of girls: 3 / 5
  • Education level of girls: 4 / 5

Dating in Malaysia:

  • Chance of arranging dates: 3 / 5
  • Casual dating culture: 3 / 5
  • Online dating popularity: 3.5 / 5

Sex in Malaysia:

  • Women's sexual activity: 3 / 5
  • One-night stands: 2.5 / 5

More about Malaysia:

  • Nightlife in general: 3.5 / 5
  • Locals' English level: 3.5 / 5
  • Budget per day: US$200 - $600
  • Accommodation: US$50 - $300

Dating

Malaysia is a constitutional monarch in Southeast Asia just north of the Equator. The country is composed of two separate regions. Peninsular Malaysia, also called West Malaysia, which is on the Malay Peninsula, and East Malaysia, which is on the island of Borneo. Peninsular Malaysia is bordered on the north by Thailand while East Malaysia shares land and maritime borders with Brunei and Indonesia. The two regions have a combined area of 330,800 kilometres and a population of approximately 30 million. Kuala Lumpur is the national capital and largest city while Putrajaya is the seat of the federal government. Unlike other former British colonies, the official language of Malaysia is Malay while English is recognized as a major language. Islam is the official religion practiced by an estimated 60% of the population.

Dating Malaysian girls is a mix of exciting and challenging. With a multi-ethnic, multicultural and multilingual society, there are three basic nationalities you are most likely to meet – Chinese, Indian, or traditional Malay. They are all beautiful, warm and friendly. Most, however, are Muslim who, because of the restrictive practices placed upon them by their religion, have a great interest in meeting western men.


Dating Culture

Malaysian parents usually assert that their children cannot date until they have finished their education. However, children often start dating at around the ages of 17 and 18. In urban areas, most other Malaysian dating and marriage practices are relatively liberal and similar to Western standards. Malays may be more traditional about relationships and marriage. It is common for them to look to marry immediately after they finish their tertiary studies as a precursor to finding a job. Once a couple is settled, they then begin taking on the responsibilities of adult life. In rural areas, dating habits are more conservative. Marriage is often expected to be the result of dating.


Women

Malaysian girls are typically broken down into three ethnic groups: Malaysian Chinese, Malaysian Indian and Malayan Malaysians.

Malays represent the dominant ethnic group in the country. Many of them are covered in traditional Muslim attire. Being a moderate Muslim state not all of these women will be covered. Malays are generally the least attractive class and most foreigners will not pursue them due to the religious element. However, there is a minority of Malays who act more western prefer foreign men. This minority is, in fact, the easiest group to bed.

Ethnic Chinese in Malaysia make up roughly 25% of the population. Most of the Chinese are descendants of immigrant workers who came to Malaysia when it was part of the British Empire in the late 19thcentury. Chinese Malaysians are generally the most attractive. They have whiter skin and possess polite dispositions. They speak both Mandarin and English. Chinese Malaysians are very open to dating foreigners. Since they are not Muslims there should be no religious or cultural barriers in dating them. These women tend to prefer foreigners.

Malaysian Indians make up about 10% of the population. As with the Chinese, Indians also immigrated to Malaysia during the time of the British Empire. It is very difficult to summarize these ethnic groups as they occupy all levels of the social-economic status ranging from poverty to high levels of government and business positions. The higher class of Malaysian Indians will be the most open to dating foreign men. Generally, they are less attractive than Malaysian Chinese but there are some stunners in the higher classes.


Malaysian Girls (age 18 - 29)

In Malaysia, a girl becomes a woman at the beginning of her menstrual cycle. Once this happens, the girl starts being treated as a woman. She is no longer expected to play childhood games outside but will be expected to spend time with her mother and other older female relatives who will train her on basic home skills in preparation for life as a wife. A part of the training results in the young girls putting on hijabs and other attires that cover much of their bodies. While these women grow breasts and experience an increase in the size of their bums and thighs, much of this is hidden under the religious attire. However, the training also emphasizes alternative areas of attraction and the girls put on designer perfumes.

For most girls in this age especially in rural areas, marriage is the next phase in life. Many girls are pushed to get married before they can be employed. While in the past many marriages were arranged by the parents, young people today get to choose their partners. However, their choice for a spouse will have to be accepted by the parents. Many urban parents are moving away from marrying off their girls early and instead educate them through college before setting them free to get married.

In Malaysia, a girl cannot leave her parent's home to live alone before getting married. No matter how old one gets, the girl is supposed to continue living with her parents until the perfect suitor comes along.


Malaysian Women (age 30 - 45)

Most Malaysian women are married and have begun their families. In all of the three indigenous ethnic groups, the role of women is clearly defined as the homemakers. Whether the woman is in formal employment, highly-educated or just staying at home, a woman is expected to take care of both her husband and her children. While many are now employed, they are still expected to be responsible for the family and to maintain the traditional role of a woman.

As compared to many countries that are predominantly Muslim, Malaysian women enjoy a significantly better form of recognition. It is estimated that women occupy about 45% of the labor force and about 15% in political positions. Women who work full time in paid employment are often exposed to a form of a 'second shift' meaning that they are still expected to do most of the cooking, housecleaning, and childcare at home. As a result, most women do not have a social life.


Malaysian Ladies (age 45+)

Having married much earlier in life, most women at this stage do not have young children to look after as by now they are all grown up. Whereas the children are all grown up and some may have even gotten married and moved out, some women shift their care from their children to their parents or their husband’s parents. This is because it is expected that once the young ones grow old enough, they should take care of their elderly parents.

Since their homes will have enough hands to do common chores, these women can go out and socialize with other women and even join social groups. However, their role to take care of the family as she is expected to be the one to serve her husband with food.


Foreign Girls (tourists, expats, students, etc.)

A lot of foreign girls in Malaysia are tourists. Malaysia is one of the most visited countries by tourists in the world. The country’s natural features together with the government’s intervention have seen tourism in the country grow in leaps and bounds. Every year, the country receives approximately 30 million tourists mainly from Asia.

In addition to the tourists, Malaysia is an emerging powerhouse and attracts many expatriates who flock into work in the country's companies and organizations. Another group of foreign girls in the country are students. Malaysia's universities are ranked as some of the best in Southeast Asia and attract many young girls from the region.


Sex

As mentioned earlier, Malaysia is dominantly Muslim and this has seen Islam influence the way of life. While many local girls are uncomfortable engaging in sex before marriage, online dating sites and apps have removed some of this shyness and many liberal young Malaysian girls are open to having sex. However, this has to be done discreetly as many young girls are very protective of their reputation.


Sex Culture

Due to the dominant influence of Islam, Malaysia has had a very conservative sex culture. This is rapidly changing due to technology but also due to the presence of many foreigners in the country who come in with their different traditions. However, a recent survey showed that many Malaysians still value being virgins until marriage. More than half of the respondents who would not have sex before marriage, also said they would not be with someone who has already had pre-marital sex.


One-Night Stands

As is bound to happen in a city with many cultures, both local and foreign, coming together, one-night stands are common in Malaysia. The city has many young men and women who do not want to get into long-term relationships but just want to have fun. Some of the best places to get these young girls are the entertainment spots and the colleges. The introduction of online applications and websites has also greatly contributed to the increase in one-night stands.


Best Places to Meet Single Girls

Malaysia is a friendly, culturally rich nation that’s modern and comfortable yet has managed to retain its ecological beauty; the country is a mix of Malay, Indian, Chinese, Arabic, European, Peranakan and other cultures and its landscape is dotted with temples that rub shoulders with mosques and churches.

You can eat and drink your way through Malaysia – its choice of gastronomic offerings is legendary. Hawkers move around on foot, bicycles, tricycles, motorcycles and vans to vend their food. Stalls line five-foot walkways and side lanes; some even operate from booths within shops, kopitiams, markets, air-conditioned restaurants and large-scale food courts within shopping malls.

Malaysia has world-renowned attractions that make a trip here immeasurably rewarding. When you're in the neighborhood be sure to catch some of this Southeast Asian starlet's best-known tourist sites – visit the tallest twin towers in the world, dive into the pristine waters of the east coast at Pulau Redang, make a beeline for the summit of Mount Kinabalu and visit one of the nation’s cool hill stations, the Cameron Highlands.


Bars, Pubs and Nightclubs

Nightlife experiences in Malaysia are plentiful as the city is teeming with bars, pubs and clubs on the streets, and swanky rooftop restaurants and bars situated within five-star hotels. After the sun sets, the country becomes alive with nightspots offering a winning combination of lively and friendly ambiance, extensive alcoholic beverages, and talented DJs spinning dance-worthy tunes.

• Changkat Bukit Bintang: Widely regarded as Kuala Lumpur’s definitive party venue, the strip is easily accessible from prominent landmarks such as Pavilion KL, Starhill Gallery, and the Jalan Alor Food Street. This narrow avenue is filled with international restaurants, nightclubs with cocktails bars, and vibrant pubs with DJs spinning music, ranging from house and electro to remixed pop and hip-hop tunes.

• Zouk KL: Zouk Kuala Lumpur, set along Jalan Tun Razak, encompasses six dynamically different themed rooms (namely Aristo & Rooftop Garden, Barsonic, Main Room, Phuture, Terrace Bar and Velvet Underground), and with frequent appearances from international heavyweights such as Above & Beyond and DJ Tiesto, it’s no wonder that Zouk is still a favorite among KL-lites even after nine years of existence.

• Play Club at the Roof: Play Club at The Roof is a premium dance club that plays host to exciting all-night parties in Petaling Jaya, drawing in a steady mix of young local trendsetters looking to mix, mingle, see and be seen. This glitzy rooftop establishment has an industrial-themed interior with exposed overhead piping, colorful neon lights, and giant cages with dancers.

• Drunk Monkey Old Street Bar: This bar in Kuching attracts a relaxed crowd of tourists and locals. There's a nightly BBQ of meaty skewers and you'll find menus from nearby restaurants scattered about. Order from the bar staff and the food will be delivered to your table by the restaurant staff. Drinks include draught Guinness, a range of imported wines and a whole page of whiskeys.

• Vinum Exchange: Equal parts cafe, bar, restaurant and wine shop, this is a game-changer for Kuala Terengganu. The stylish interior features a great selection of international wine and spirits lining one wall. Other drinking options include espresso, beer and cider.

• Botakliquor: This is a franchise of three clubs in China Town, Merdeka Square and Bukit Nanas. Hanging baskets and lush potted plants framing the bar set the leafy, botanical tone for the superior cocktails made by the mixologists at this cocktail bar in the Chō Chǎ Foodstore building. Ingredients such as pandan, jasmine, tarragon and kaffir lime feature in the drinks.

• Ruai Bar: This self-styled 'Modern Dayak' bar features a mash-up of modern and indigenous design, and there's occasional live music – including metal and local hip hop – at weekends. Beers are cheap and cold, and more adventurous imbibers can sample tuak (rice wine) and more potent langkau infused with flavors like cinnamon and vanilla.

• Geographer Café: A swinging recorded soundtrack of jazz and classic pop keeps the beers flowing at this traveler magnet in Melaka City. The first cafe to open on Jonker St (in 1999), it's a true Melaka institution. Strewn with greenery, the interior is attractive and comfortable, making it a great choice at any time of the day.

• Only One: This is one of the few bars that serve wine (Spanish and Australian) to accompany surprisingly good Thai and Western food. The open-sided design makes it a great place to wait out a downpour, and there's a big screen for watching sport. It is found in Kota Bharu.

• Yellow Café: The best bar in Pantai Cenang has a mellow soundtrack, seating at yellow tables, on yellow beanbags or in yellow hammocks, and a big menu of beach snacks and cocktails.

• The Barber: The designers of this repurposed barber's salon in Kuching made use of the original tiled floor, the mirrors and even old hairdryers to create a suitably hip hangout for Kuching's in-crowd.

Other popular clubs in the country include PS150 in Chinatown, RGB in Kuala Lumpur and Suzie Wong in Bukit Bintang.


Shopping Malls

Some of the malls in Malaysia include:

Pavillion in Kuala Lumpur

• Lot 10 in Kuala Lumpur

• Gurney Plaza in Georgetown

• 1 Utama in Petaling Jaya

• Sunway Pyramid in Petaling Jaya

• Great Eastern Mall in Kuala Lumpur

• Bangsar Shopping Centre in Lake Gardens

• The Gardens Mall in Lake Gardens


Outdoors

Blue Mansion: The most photographed building in George Town, this magnificent 38-room; the 220-window mansion was built in the 1880s and rescued from ruin in the 1990s. Today a lavish, antique-filled hotel, its distinctive blue-hued exterior is the result of an indigo-based limewash.

At 23 square kilometer, Penang National Park is Malaysia's smallest national park, but its beach-fringed forests are home to silvered leaf monkeys, flying lemurs, leopard cats and abundant bird, amphibian and reptile species. You can easily fill a day with activities such as jungle walks and boat trips to serene golden-sand beaches. Bus 101 runs here from central George Town.

Agop Batu Tulug: This hill, 2km north of the Batuh Putih Bridge, features three caves housing the ancestors of local Orang Sungai (People of the River). Because the Kinabatangan has a habit of frequent flooding, the final resting place of the dead has traditionally been located in cave complexes. Nine-hundred-year-old ironwood coffins are interred in the Batu Tulug caves with spears, knives, gongs, bells and Chinese curios, making the hill one of the most important archaeological sites in Sabah.

Kellie’s Castle: Steeped in tragic legend, this monument to British eccentricity stands marooned by the highway, 5km east of Batu Gajah. Known as Kellie’s Folly, the Gothic- and Moorish-style castle was commissioned by wealthy Scottish rubber-plantation owner William Kellie Smith, whose sudden death left it abandoned. It's now reasonably well restored, with a few rooms richly furnished in early 20th-century style.

Just 13km north of Kuala Lumpur are the iconic Batu Caves, a Malaysian national treasure, Hindu pilgrimage site and wildlife-conservation zone. Behind a 42.7m statue of Hindu deity Murugan, 272 steps climb to limestone caves housing temples that have drawn pilgrims for over 120 years. Prowled by monkeys and attracting a dizzying number of tourists and devotees, Batu Caves is an unforgettable excursion from Kuala Lumpur.

Around 25km north of Sandakan, and covering 40 sq km of the Kabili-Sepilok Forest Reserve, this inspiring, world-famous center welcomes orphaned and injured orangutans for rehabilitation before returning them to forest life. There are around 200 living in the reserve, though only a few are regular visitors to the feeding platform. At the outdoor nursery, a short walk from the feeding platform, you can watch orphaned youngsters at play.

Resembling twin silver rockets, the Petronas Towers are the perfect allegory for the meteoric rise of the city from a tin-mining shanty town to a 21st-century metropolis. Half of the daily allocation of tickets for 45-minute tours – which take in the Skybridge on the 41st floor and the observation deck on the 86th – are sold online in advance. Otherwise, turn up early to be sure of scoring a ticket to go up. The 88-story twin towers are the tallest pair in the world at nearly 452m and their floor plan is based on an eight-sided star that echoes arabesque patterns.

The series of freshwater rock pools at Telaga Tujuh, located at the top of a waterfall inland from Pantai Kok, makes a refreshing alternative to splashing about in the ocean. To get here, follow the road from Pantai Kok past Oriental Village (Sky Cab is well signposted) until it ends at a car park. From here it’s a steady 10-minute climb through the rainforest (stay to the right) to the wells at the top of the falls.

Masjid Jamek Sultan Abdul Samad: This graceful, onion-domed mosque in Kuala Lumpur, designed by British architect AB Hubback, borrows Mogul and Moorish styles with its brick-and-plaster banded minarets and three shapely domes. Located where the Gombak and Klang rivers meet, Masjid Jamek was the first brick mosque in Malaysia when completed in 1909. It remained the city's center of Islamic worship until the opening of the National Mosque in 1965.


Universities and Colleges

Some of the universities and colleges found in the city include:

• University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur

• The National University of Malaysia, Bangi

• University of Science, Georgetown

• Multimedia University, Cyberjaya

• International Islamic University, Kuala Lumpur

• Management and Science University, Shah Alam

• Sunway College, Petaling Jaya

• Southern University College, Kuala Lumpur

• Admal Aviation College, Sepang

• Geospatial Science and Technology College, Kuala Lumpur


Relationship

While today’s generation will always be considered bolder and more outgoing than generations of the past, some Malaysians surprisingly still hold traditionalist views when it comes to dating. Although you will find women more liberal and open-minded, they always consider what their parents want. If you want to marry her then you need to prove to her parents that you can really treat her well and obviously that you are a successful and hardworking man. Imperatively, Malaysian women take a long time to decide that you are the perfect life partner for her. So you need to have more patience and let her get impressed with your sincerity and truthfulness.

Malaysia is a well-developed country so women here hold a class and they demand the same from the men they are going to date. These women are well educated and hence they always prefer to date an educated man. If you want to date her using an online dating website then always prefer to polish your profile in such a way that she can feel impressed with it.

It is a well-researched fact that Malaysian women often love to date serious men. And they care about this thing even while chatting on social media. If she is asking you something important and you do not have anything to replay except few emoticons then definitely you are going to lose your chances to date her. The best tip is to give her the best answers so that she can realize that you are serious to date her. Thus, if you wish to improve the chances of dating her then you must prove yourself honest; always prefer to give her honest answers when she asks something.


Holiday Romance

The beautiful beaches, the warm atmosphere and numerous outdoor activities provide the perfect getaway for a holiday romance. Holidays are a time when we want to get away from everything and go somewhere to unwind from the pressure of work and life. Holidays provide the best opportunity to meet people from different parts of the world.as mentioned earlier, Malaysia hosts many young beautiful women, many of whom are out to have a good time. The attractions in the country provide good places to spend time with a girl.


Tips for Successful Relationship

We all long for the perfect relationship straight from a movie where love conquers all and the two of you live together happily ever after. While movies, may exaggerate the ideals of true love, it is possible to have a relationship that makes you smile every time your girl walks into a room. For this to happen, the two of you have to go out of your way and make the relationship work.

Many relations go through a rough patch when the two partners do not get what they want. More often than not, this happens when one does not know what the other person wants. However long we stay with someone or have known them, we should never assume that they know what we need or how we feel. To avoid the situation where your partner is unsure of what you want or why you are frowning, you should tell them if you need them to do something for you.

Biologically and emotionally, men and women are wired differently. Each sex has its generic traits that define them. While women are generally bound to open up on their emotions and feelings, men do not easily open up to others or show emotion. This however does not indicate a lack of emotion. As the two of you get into a relationship, you need to understand this and know how to treat each other's feelings.

Even as men and women are separated by their gender, any two people, even if they are of the same gender, are different. Coming from different backgrounds and having gone through different upbringings, the two of you will have differences in thought and how you react to external influences. The two of you must try as much as possible to learn about each other and also be tolerant of the shortcoming of each other.


Love

Dating’ is often understood as ‘in a relationship.’ When a Malaysian says they’re dating someone, they mean they are seeing someone exclusively. As such, the concept ‘dating around’ is not a common one. Although secular, as a predominantly Muslim country Malaysia is quite conservative when it comes to dating. Typically Malaysian men and women get to know each other for a specific purpose which is an exclusive relationship with the hope of it leading to marriage.

Any public displays of affection are frowned upon and should be avoided in Malaysia. Even though men and women date, the blessing and approval of one's family is still an important factor when it comes to Malaysian dating and choosing a future partner.


How to Make Sure She Is the One

Even as we seek for the right lady to date, we all have our preferences in terms of who the right person for us is. Some of these qualities may be generic but some of them are unique to our taste.

You should find someone with whom you can sustain a conversation. However beautiful a girl can be, her looks will count very little once the two of you settle down together in your marital home. The two of you should be able to hold all manners of conversation together both serious stuff and humor.

A good woman will not only be kind and courteous to you but others around you. They say that how someone treats a waiter in a hotel brings out their real character. If she is kind to such people, she is the one.

In life, we all have personal ambitions that we seek. As the two of you come together, she should have realistic ambitions for her growth even as the two of you seek to grow together.

Even as we are busy in life developing ourselves, another way to know if she is the one for you is if she is willing to sacrifice time and effort to spend time with you. If she is continually busy with little or no time to spare now, she will not have time when you are married.


Marriage

Malaysia has a dual legal system, which means that the minimum age of marriage can be determined by either civil law or the Syaria (Islamic) law. Non-Muslims may only marry from the age of 18, but girls can be married as early as 16 provided they or their parents have the permission of the State Chief Minister.

The two types of legally recognized marriages in Malaysia are:

• Civil marriage; and

• Islamic marriage;

The civil or monogamous opposite-sex marriage is being practiced by non-Muslims and non-natives in Malaysia under the Law Reform (Marriage and Divorce) Act 1976 [Act 164]. Non-Muslims continue to insist on strictly monogamy marital relationships as an essential of marriage.

Monogamy simply means a marriage with one spouse at a time. Bigamy is a crime in Malaysia. If you are lawfully married under any law, religion or custom to one or more spouses, you are not allowed to contract a valid marriage with another person, whether your marriage is contracted within Malaysia or outside Malaysia. If you have contravened the above provision, you are deemed to have committed the offense of marrying again during the life-time of husband or wife, as the case may be, within the meaning of Section 494 of the Penal Code.

Whereas in Islamic marriage, polygamy is permitted with certain restrictions, men can only marry up to four wives at any one time, though most men have only one. Muslim women are not allowed to practice polyandry in which one woman has more than one husband at the same time.

Under Section 23 of the Islamic Family Law (Federal Territories) Act 1984, a husband desiring polygamy must obtain the consent and views of the existing wife or wives and the permission from the Syariah Court to enter into a polygamous marriage, failing which he is deemed to have committed an offense under Section 123 of the Act.

Malayan weddings are generally festive, grand and celebratory affairs with many guests. Ceremonies may be held over several days in traditional Malay weddings. The marriage is solemnized during the solemnization ceremony. The highlight of the wedding is the bersanding (sitting-in-state ceremony), which is followed by a feast for family and friends. Some couples choose to simplify matters, opting to have only the solemnization ceremony and a simple lunch reception. This may be an effort to reduce costs or to ensure that the wedding is more aligned to Islamic beliefs.

Marriage is traditionally initiated by merisik, a process in which a senior and respected member of the groom’s family visits the prospective bride’s family to learn about her background, and whether she is agreeable to the marriage. He is usually accompanied by a small entourage bearing gifts.

If the bride is found to be acceptable, a proposal would be made, traditionally in the form of poetic Malay verses. Today, merisik may not be conducted, as most couples already know each other well before marriage is considered. At times, the meeting may just be a formality for the in-laws to get to know each other and to set a date for the engagement. Once the proposal is accepted – this may take up to a week – the engagement date is determined.


Wedding

The wedding ceremony begins with the groom going to the bride’s home, usually accompanied by a band, bunga manggar (palm blossoms made from tinsel paper) carriers, friends and relatives. The band members usually sing verses from the Quran, seeking blessings for the couple. The band lends an air of festivity to the occasion and creates an atmosphere of gaiety. When the groom arrives at the bride’s home, her friends and relatives will try to prevent him from reaching the bride. The groom will then give a present of money to bribe his way to his bride.

The highlight of the wedding is the bersanding, when the bridal couple, in their wedding finery, sits on thrones placed on the dais. They are treated as king and queen for the day. During the ceremony, friends, relatives and guests offer their blessings and congratulations and sprinkle yellow rice and flower petals – both items are symbols of fertility – on the bridal couple.

After the ceremony, the bride and groom will eat together in the makan berdamai or makan bersama ceremony. In the past, this ceremony used to be held in the bridal suite in the presence of senior family members, during which the bride serves her husband's food for the first time. Today, the bridal couple usually feasts together with their guests.

The reception after the bersanding ceremony typically consists of a feast, accompanied by band performances or guests singing karaoke. In the past, guests would bring dishes to the feast, and friends and relatives would also arrive a few days early to help with decorations or provide other forms of assistance. Today, most couples engage professional caterers and hired help


Family Life

Families in Malaysia may belong to any one of the main ethnic groups: Malay, Chinese, or Indian. Extended families often live together, and elders are highly respected. Parents like to be included when their children make decisions. Cooperation and loyalty are valued in Malaysian families. Young married couples tend to live near their parents, and unmarried adults continue to live with their parents until they marry. Rural households are more likely to include parents, married sons and their families, and all unmarried children. Urban families tend to be smaller, with an average of two or three children.

As in most collectivist cultures, extended families are seen as the basic unit of society – the first group a person becomes a member of at birth. Therefore, families are perceived as having a collective face. In this way, the act of an individual can impact the perception of the entire family by others and the interests of the family supersede those of the individual.

The patriarch of the household is often the father of Malaysian families. However, it is the elders who handle important family matters. The oldest members of the family are consulted before any major decision and demand the most respect. In Chinese-Malaysian households, filial piety is displayed at all times.

The mother's role usually involves the traditional domestic duties of a household and caring for the children. Though gender roles are changing in the younger generations, women do not have as much power as men. Even those who go on to have careers will depend on their husband or father financially at some point. Furthermore, family lineage, guardianship and inheritance are codified in-laws in favor of males.


Regions

Cities

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