Innsbruck

From Dating Local Girls
Home / Europe / Central Europe / Austria / Innsbruck

Innsbruck dating guide advises how to meet single girls. You just need to know the basic steps how to date Austrian women. Learn how to arrange dates with hot Austrian girls, how to take your relationship to the next level and how to find your soulmate and fall in love. Read more on how to date local women and where to meet girls in Innsbruck, Austria.


Girls in Innsbruck:

  • Looks of girls: 4 / 5
  • Attitude of girls: 3 / 5
  • Loyalty of girls: 2.5 / 5
  • Education level of girls: 4 / 5

Dating in Innsbruck:

  • Chance of arranging dates: 4 / 5
  • Casual dating culture: 4 / 5
  • Online dating popularity: 4 / 5

Sex in Innsbruck:

  • Women's sexual activity: 3.5 / 5
  • One-night stands: 4 / 5

More about Innsbruck:

  • Nightlife in general: 4 / 5
  • Locals' English level: 3 / 5
  • Moving around the city: 3 / 5
  • Budget per day: US$150 - $500
  • Accommodation: US$50 - $200

Dating

Innsbruck is the capital city of Tyrol and the fifth-largest city in Austria. It is located on the River Inn, at its junction with the Wipp Valley, which provides access to the Brenner Pass some 30 km (18.6 mi) to the south. The city has a population of approximately 140,000. Innsbruck is divided into nine boroughs that were formed from previously independent municipalities or villages. Due to its location between high mountains, Innsbruck serves as an ideal place for skiing in winter, ski-jumping and mountaineering in summer. There are several ski resorts around Innsbruck.

For Austrian women, dating is not just a source of entertainment. When an Austrian girl is in a committed relationship, she can see the man as her potential husband. That is why one will hardly find any girls in Austria with a large number of ex-partners. Austrian women are big believers in the traditional family.


Dating Culture

Despite that initial shyness apparently, Austrians are more willing than some more conservative cultures to move on from the kissing and the cuddling and into the bedroom. Austrians tend to be well-educated and polite - and men like to be chivalrous, holding open doors for a woman and helping her with her coat. Most guys will want to pay for dinner on the first date.


Women

The legal position of women in Austria improved since the middle of the 1970s. Concerning women's rights, the priority in Austria is based on the equal treatment of both genders, rather than having equal rights only. Thus, Austrian women benefit from their government's attempt to compensate for gender-specific inequality of burdens. However, the concept of traditional roles, influenced by Roman Catholicism in Austria, is still prevalent within Austrian society.

In recent years, new ways of living have emerged, with unmarried cohabitation increasing, as more young people question traditional ways.

Most women are employed, but many work part-time. In the European Union, only the Netherlands has more women working part-time. As in other German-speaking areas of Europe, social norms regarding gender roles are quite conservative.


Austrian Girls (age 18 - 29)

Austrian girls have many amazing qualities that make them the most coveted European girls. Whether one prefers tall or petite girls, would love a wife to have some curves or prefer skinny and fit women, cannot get enough of raven-haired women or have always dreamed of a woman who rocks rainbow hair, one will not have any problems trying to find an Austrian woman who matches one’s description of the ideal bride.

The fashion sense of Austrian girls is another thing that makes them so attractive. Austrian brides have a classic, somewhat conservative taste in fashion. It means that any woman you meet in the streets of Vienna or other Austrian cities will be dressed perfectly appropriate for the occasion and extremely tastefully. The same goes for their choice of footwear and accessories.


Austrian Women (age 30 - 45)

It is hard to see an Austrian woman wearing a sequined dress to go out to buy milk or stiletto heels when she is walking her dog. At the same time, Austrian women have a natural sense of style that they unleash on special occasions. Whenever one takes one’s Austrian beauty for a night out, one can rest assured that she will be the best-dressed guest at any event.

It’s probably impossible to be surrounded by the incredible Austrian culture and not grow up to be an intelligent and educated individual, and Austrian women are possibly the best proof of this rule. Since early childhood, Austrian women are constantly receiving new knowledge, first from their equally intelligent parents and then from their teachers. Plus, Austrian women are very fond of reading and usually have an admirable collection of books in their homes. As a result, an Austrian girl may be the most interesting conversation partner you have ever had. She will be able to confidently discuss anything from current political events to a specific era in literature.


Austrian Ladies (age 45+)

Austrian ladies are big believers in the traditional family. Although they don’t usually get married until their mid- or late twenties, they love imagining the future married life with their beloved husband and adorable children.

The traditional family for an Austrian lady means a husband and children, but while she is prepared to do anything for her loved ones, she will probably want to keep her job and any interests and hobbies she might have. These women believe in equal partnerships in families and one will need to share the family duties want to create a strong foundation for the shared love.

Austrian ladies are naturally good at keeping the house tidy and neat. Their cooking skills and the delicious Austrian delicacies they serve to their families will make you forget about frozen or takeaway meals.


Foreign Girls (tourists, expats, students, etc.)

With its reputation as a resort town, Innsbruck attracts many foreign girls. Tucked away in the dramatic landscapes of the Alps, Innsbruck is a true alpine gem and renowned worldwide for its ski resorts and tradition of hosting winter sports competitions. Its long history as the center of the Tyrol region and modern history as a winter sports haven draws people from all over the globe. It is located both close to Munich and Northern Italy making it a must-see alpine destination.


Sex

As is bound to be the case in any city where many tourists frequent, many local girls go to the resort town looking for opportunities to have a good time with the tourists. This is in addition to the local girls who go there as tourists.


Sex Culture

Austrians are not shy about sex. Although more than half the population is made up of devout Catholics, casual sex is frequent in the country. Brothels are legal here (but tightly regulated), and sex shops aren't hidden in dark alleyways but tend to be visible on shopping streets. This is partly informed by the fact that the population of Innsbruck is made up of many foreigners.


One-Night Stands

As is bound to happen in a city with many cultures, both local and foreign, coming together, one-night stands are common in Innsbruck. The city has many young men and women who do not want to get into long-term relationships but just want to have fun. This is informed by the fact that some of the tourists are only passing by the city going elsewhere in the skiing circuit and do not spend much time in the town.


Best Places to Meet Single Girls

Tyrol’s capital is a sight to behold. The jagged rock spires of the Nordkette range are so close that within minutes it’s possible to travel from the city's heart to more than 2000m above sea level and alpine pastures where cowbells chime. Summer and winter activities abound, and it’s understandable why some visitors only take a peek at Innsbruck proper before heading for the hills. Innsbruck is in many ways Austria in microcosm: its late-medieval Altstadt is picture-book stuff, presided over by a grand Habsburg palace and baroque cathedral, while its Olympic ski jump with big mountain views makes a spectacular leap between the urban and the outdoors.


Bars, Pubs and Nightclubs

• Dachsbau

• Tabledance Tirol

• Maxim

• Bacchus Innsbruck

• Blue Chip

• Queen’s Club

• Party Club 69

• Club Cubique

• B1 Lounge

• Tante Emma Club

• C.U. Cocktail Lounge


Shopping Malls

Some of the malls in Innsbruck include:

• Kaufhaus Tyrol

• Sillpark

• DEZ Innsbruck

• Shopping Center West

• Greif Center

• Cyta Shoppingwelt

• M4


Outdoors

Schloss Ambras: Picturesquely perched on a hill and set among beautiful gardens, this Renaissance pile was acquired in 1564 by Archduke Ferdinand II, then ruler of Tyrol, who transformed it from a fortress into a palace. Some of the attractions include the centerpiece Spanische Saal (Spanish Hall), the dazzling Armour Collection and the gallery's Velázquez and Van Dyck originals.

Hofkirche: Innsbruck’s pride and joy is the Gothic Hofkirche, one of Europe’s finest royal court churches. It was commissioned in 1553 by Ferdinand I, who enlisted top artists of the age such as Albrecht Dürer, Alexander Colin and Peter Vischer the Elder. Top billing goes to the empty sarcophagus of Emperor Maximilian I (1459–1519), a masterpiece of German Renaissance sculpture, elaborately carved from black marble.

Goldenes Dachl: Innsbruck's golden wonder and most distinctive landmark is this Gothic oriel, built for Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I, lavishly festooned with murals and glittering with 2657 fire-gilt copper tiles. It is most impressive from the exterior, but the museum is worth a look – especially if you have the Innsbruck Card – with an audio guide whisking you through the history.

Bergisel: Rising above Innsbruck like a celestial staircase, this glass-and-steel ski jump was designed by much-lauded Iraqi architect Zaha Hadid. It is 455 steps or a two-minute funicular ride to the 50m-high viewing platform, with a breathtaking panorama of the Nordkette Range, Inntal and Innsbruck.

Alpenzoo: Billing itself as a conservation-oriented zoo, this is where you can get close to alpine wildlife such as golden eagles, chamois and ibex. It's a 10-minute uphill walk from Innstrasse, or you can take Bus W from the Marktplatz or the Hungerburgbahn to the Alpenzoo stop.


Universities and Colleges

• University of Innsbruck

• Innsbruck Medical University

• MCI Management Center Innsbruck


Relationship

There almost is no such thing as dating in Austria. You don’t just walk up to someone and ask them out. They would most likely say no and be freaked out by you. It’s almost as awkward as asking them for sex right away. You first need to get to know people casually by doing stuff together with people you two know. Only after some time (we’re talking weeks or even months here) you two might hang out alone. But that’s not a date then, it’s just two people who know each other spending time together. Almost all the Austrian relationships started with having a couple of drinks while others start with online dating platforms.


Holiday Romance

Holidays are times when we set out to unwind and stay away from the pressure of work and maybe even friends. Rarely do we set out with the intention of meeting someone and spending time with them. That is what makes holiday romance special. In our wandering about in a foreign land, we are bound to meet many new faces. Whether it is a local girl or a tourist, holidays accord us the time and environment to be adventurous and meet new people. Holidays in Innsbruck are interesting as the environment and the scenery and other attractions provide an ideal backdrop for the two of you to enjoy your romance and even grow it beyond the holiday.


Tips for Successful Relationship

Just like everywhere else, relationships in Austria have differences from relationships elsewhere. This is informed by culture and traditions.

Even though we live in the modern world, and the feminist movement is not just an abstract concept, many women in Austria still expect a man to treat them. If you invite a lady to a cafe, restaurant, museum, just anywhere – in case you want to impress her, be ready to cover the costs.

Austrians in general love joking, and there is a lot of irony in Austrian humor too. That said, if you're dating an Austrian, don't joke about their family or relatives. This topic is seen as something too personal, so the joke may be taken negatively.

If you are a lady, being a little late will be excused, if not expected. Gentlemen, you’d better be on time, although everyone understands if some emergency or terrible traffic jam influences your plans.

In many cultures, playfully touching someone’s face is seen as a friendly gesture, but in Austria, it is not that common. Many consider this as quite an intimate expression of affection, so if you've just met someone and don't know each other well yet, it's better not to do it, to avoid misunderstanding or a negative reaction.


Love

Understanding the Austrian dating culture can do wonders for your love life. Getting into a relationship with someone from another culture can be complex, as each culture places its values on which qualities make someone a desirable partner. For example, what might be considered romantic, attractive or polite in one culture might not be well received in Austria. The women here are not the most beautiful on Earth but at the same time, they are among the most "independent" and reserved in the world, probably due to the high living standard. You are not supposed to flirt with women in public places.


How to Make Sure She Is the One

You should find someone with whom you can sustain a conversation. However beautiful a girl can be, her looks will count very little once the two of you settle down together in your marital home. The two of you should be able to hold all manners of conversation together both serious stuff and humor.

A good woman will not only be kind and courteous to you but others around you. They say that how someone treats a waiter in a hotel brings out their real character. If she is kind to such people, she is the one.

In life, we all have personal ambitions that we seek. As the two of you come together, she should have realistic ambitions for her growth even as the two of you seek to grow together.

Even as we are busy in life developing ourselves, another way to know if she is the one for you is if she is willing to sacrifice time and effort to spend time with you. If she is continually busy with little or no time to spare now, she will not have time when you are married.


Marriage

The legal age for either sex is 18. Persons at least 16 years of age may also marry upon presentation of written, notarized consent from both parents and if the other spouse is at least 18 years old.

The following documents are required:

• Passport

• Birth Certificate (original or certified copy)

• Driver's License or any other document that shows the address of residence

• A residence registration form ("Meldezettel") issued by the Austrian authorities after arrival, unless the applicants are staying in a hotel, youth hostel, etc.

• Documentary proof of dissolution of previous marriage(s), if any, e.g., final divorce or annulment decrees (Mexican divorces are usually not recognized in Austria) or death certificate(s) of previous spouse(s). The marriage certificate(s) of such previous marriage(s) is/are also usually required. Documents (other than passports and driver's licenses) not in German must be accompanied by certified translations done by an official translator.

Only civil marriages are legal in Austria. They may, however, be followed by religious ceremonies if desired. Civil marriages are performed by officials of the Vital Statistics Office (Standesamt) in the appropriate jurisdiction. The ceremony takes place at the Standesamt. If either party to the marriage is an Austrian citizen or resides in Austria (regardless of citizenship), the marriage application must be filed at the Standesamt in the locality of that residence. If both parties to the marriage are neither Austrians nor residents, the application must be filed at the Standesamt for the First District of Vienna.


Wedding

Traditionally, a bride has to get out of bed very early on her wedding day. At dawn neighbors and friends come to rudely awaken the bride from sleep. With gunshots or firecrackers, the bride is "greeted". Also, evil spirits should be driven away by the noise. While it was the unmarried men who woke the bride in former times, these are mixed groups today. Nowadays, however, one should inform the residents and the community before carrying out the tradition.

The bride is picked up on her wedding day from her parents' home. Today, the custom has changed to the effect that most grooms fetch their future wives from home with their groomsmen. The groom is already running ahead with the decorated wedding car and traditionally also has the bride's bouquet with him. Together with the bride, this group proceeds to the registry office or church. In many areas of Austria, this path does not lead directly to the destination. Friends and neighbors are waiting along the route to block the newlyweds off. The couple has to stop, get out and complete a given task, for example, sawing through a log together. Only after the newlyweds have completed this operation can the journey be continued.

Those who choose a Christian ceremony and a church as part of their marriage usually cling to faith. However, from region to region the walk down the aisle in the church differs. In some areas you stride directly from the registry office into the church with all guests together; this is called Ehrenzug in German. The couple already comes in as a married couple. In other areas often the guests enter the church first, the newlyweds follow.

After the official ceremony, the Agape heralds one of the more informal parts of the wedding celebration. Traditionally a snack is served now, called the Agape. This gives a couple time to breathe and they have the chance to chat with those wedding guests who are not invited to the evening entertainment. Guests can now congratulate the couple and present their gifts. If you hold it the traditional way, only bread, salt and wine may be served at the Agape. This is due to the significance of the term "agape" in Catholic and Protestant faith, where it represents a meal together during a church service. Especially in Carinthia and Upper Austria great value is still placed on this tradition.


Family Life

The nuclear family is the most common household unit in Austria. Families tend to be small, usually consisting of the parents and one or two children. Rural families are typically larger, with two to four children. Those in rural areas tend to live near the extended family, and will often rely on their family network to help raise children. For example, grandmothers will care for their grandchildren while the parents work. In urban areas, extended families tend not to reside together, largely due to limited space in housing and the wide availability of childcare options.

When young adults begin their tertiary education or employment, they usually leave their parents' home to live in their apartment or with friends. However, due to the competitive housing situation in Austria, many young adults may not leave their family's home until they finish university or will move back in after graduation.

Regardless of where one resides, adult children are expected to keep in touch with their parents and care for them when they age. Traditionally, the elderly would live with their children until they passed away. However, it is becoming more common for elderly Austrians to live in retirement homes. When people die, they are usually buried in a family burial site, near where their families have lived.


See Also